Breed Info - French Bulldog breeder NY State - French Bulldog puppies for sale Rochester NY and Buffalo NY area

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Bulldogs are not an easy breed to raise and to own, please do your research before buying in order to avoid later disappointment due to this breed's specific health issues with palate, nostrils, curvature of the spine, food sensitivities, low tolerance to heat and cold.
This is a high maintenance breed and if you decide on one of the French Bulldogs as your life companion you must be prepared for extra emotional and monetary expenses that come with owning one! Please read an article published by AKC. See below:




Information on French Bulldog's Health issues as found on AKC's (American Kennel Club) webpage.
Provide your Frenchie with regular checkups, routine vaccinations, tests for intestinal parasites, heartworm prevention, and flea and tick control. Your vet should do regular dental checkups and care, and you should clean your dog’s teeth regularly at home as well. As a short-faced, brachycephalic, dwarf breed, French Bulldogs may have some health concerns that you should be aware of. The short face can make their breathing less efficient than that of long-nosed breeds, so Frenchies have less tolerance of heat, exercise, and stress, all of which increase their need to breathe. Keep your French Bulldog cool in warm weather, and avoid strenuous exercise.If your dog seems to overheat or become stressed too easily, with noisy breathing and sometimes spitting up foam, consult the vet and have its airway evaluated for pinched nostrils or an elongated soft palate. Anesthesia is also more risky in short-faced dogs, so be sure your veterinarian is experienced with such breeds should your Frenchie need to be anesthetized. The spine also merits special attention. Like other dwarf breeds, the stocky French Bulldog may also have abnormal vertebrae and/or premature degeneration of the intervertebral discs. While the spine is supported by good musculature, herniation of degenerated discs can cause problems, and most symptomatic back problems are due to disc disease rather than to abnormal vertebrae.
Interesting article from AKC website/warning against grain-free diet!

The FDA launched an investigation into potential links between canine heart disease and diet — specifically grain-free diets. We’ve compiled the information you need to know to understand this recent development.

What is the FDA Investigating?
It is easy to jump to conclusions anytime we see an FDA headline about pet food. After all, our dog’s health is important to us, and we know that diet can make a big difference in a dog’s wellbeing. We reached out to Dr. Jerry Klein, the Chief Veterinary Officer of the AKC, to hear his thoughts on the investigation.

“The FDA is investigating a potential dietary link between canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and dogs eating certain grain-free pet foods. The foods of concern are those containing legumes such as peas or lentils, other legume seeds, or potatoes listed as primary ingredients. The FDA began investigating this matter after it received a number of reports of DCM in dogs that had been eating these diets for a period of months to years. DCM itself is not considered rare in dogs, but these reports are unusual because the disease occurred in breeds of dogs not typically prone to the disease.”

What is Dilated Cardiomyopathy?
Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a type of canine heart disease that affects the heart muscle. The hearts of dogs with DCM have a decreased ability to pump blood, which often results in congestive heart failure.

Some breeds, especially large and giant breeds, have a predisposition to DCM. These breeds include Doberman Pinschers, Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, and Saint Bernards. While DCM is less common in medium and small breeds, English and American Cocker Spaniels are also predisposed to this condition.

When early reports from the veterinary cardiology community indicated that recent, atypical cases in breeds like Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Whippets, Bulldogs, and Shih Tzus all consistently ate grain alternatives in their diets, the FDA took notice.

Should you be Concerned About Grain-Free Diets?
According to Dr. Klein, “At this time, there is no proof that these ingredients are the cause of DCM in a broader range of dogs, but dog owners should be aware of this alert from the FDA. The FDA continues to work with veterinary cardiologists and veterinary nutritionists to better understand the effect, if any, of grain-free diets on dogs.”

As a general rule of thumb, the best thing you can do for your dog’s dietary health is to consult your veterinarian, not the internet. Together you can weigh the pros and cons of your dog’s diet and if necessary monitor your dog for signs of DCM.

Link toabove mentioned AKC article:


 
 
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